A survey on gram-negative bacteria in saffron finches (Sicalis flaveola) from illegal wildlife trade in Brazil

  • Yamê Miniero Davies Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Marta Brito Guimarães Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Liliane Milanelo Parque Ecológico do Tietê, Núcleo Engenheiro Goulart
  • Maria Gabriela Xavier de Oliveira Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Vasco Túlio de Moura Gomes Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Natalia Philadelpho Azevedo Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Marcos Paulo Vieira Cunha Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Luisa Zanolli Moreno Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Débora Cristina Romero Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Ana Paula Guarnieri Christ Secretaria do Meio Ambiente, Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento Ambiental
  • Maria Inês Zanoli Sato Secretaria do Meio Ambiente, Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento Ambiental
  • Andrea Micke Moreno Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Departamento de Patologia Veterinária
  • Antonio José Piantino Ferreira Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Lilian Rose Marques de Sá Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
  • Terezinha Knöbl Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia
Keywords: Birds, Sicalis flaveola, Microbiology, Enterobacteria, Public health

Abstract

Passerines such as canaries or finches are the most unlawfully captured species that are sent to wildlife centers in São Paulo, Brazil. Captured birds may have infection by opportunistic bacteria in stressful situations. This fact becomes relevant when seized passerine are reintroduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the health state of finches from illegal wildlife trade using microbiological approaches. Microbiological samples were collected by cloacal and tracheal swabs of 100 birds, captured during 2012 and 2013. The results indicate high frequency of gram-negative bacteria in feces and oropharynx, especially from the Enterobacteriaceae family (97.5%). The most frequent genera were Escherichia coli (46.5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10.4%). Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia liquefaciens, Serratia spp. Klebsiella oxytoca and Citrobacter freundii were isolated with lower frequency from asymptomatic birds. The presence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Shiga toxin-producing strain (STEC) confirm the zoonotic risks and public health concern.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Published
2016-10-19
How to Cite
Davies, Y., Guimarães, M., Milanelo, L., Oliveira, M. G., Gomes, V. T., Azevedo, N., Cunha, M. P., Moreno, L., Romero, D., Christ, A. P., Sato, M. I., Moreno, A., Ferreira, A. J., Sá, L. R., & Knöbl, T. (2016). A survey on gram-negative bacteria in saffron finches (Sicalis flaveola) from illegal wildlife trade in Brazil. Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Research and Animal Science, 53(3), 286-294. https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.1678-4456.bjvras.2016.109042