Comparative anatomy of the pelvic nerves in bearded capuchins (Sapajus sp)

  • Ediana Vasconcelos da Silva Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Mestrado em Ciências da Saúde Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Laboratório de Estudos em Morfologia de Primatas
  • Sylla Figueredo da Silva Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Mestrado em Ciências da Saúde Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Laboratório de Estudos em Morfologia de Primatas
  • Roqueline Ametila Glória Martins de Freitas Aversi-Ferreira Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Laboratório de Estudos em Morfologia de Primatas Faculdade de Palmas
  • Tainá de Abreu Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Laboratório de Estudos em Morfologia de Primatas Universidade de Brasília, Departamento de Fisiologia, Laboratório de Neurociências e Comportamento de Primatas
  • Hisao Nishijo Universidade de Toyama, Faculdade de Medicina e Ciências Farmacêuticas, Pós-graduação em Ciência do Sistema Emocional
  • Tales Alexandre Aversi-Ferreira Universidade de Toyama, Faculdade de Medicina e Ciências Farmacêuticas, Pós-graduação em Ciência do Sistema Emocional Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Departamento de Biologia Estrutural
Keywords: Primatology, Morphology of the Recent Groups, Bearded Capuchins, Pelvic Limbs, Nerves

Abstract

Bearded capuchins (Sapajus sp), unexpectedly, share with chimpanzees behavioral features such as high cognitive ability, good memory, tool use with intermittent bipedalism, and social tolerance; although its anatomy is still little studied. To test the hypothesis that bearded capuchins might share similar anatomical features with chimpanzees, we investigated the pelvic nerves of the bearded capuchin and compared them with the data in the previous literature for modern humans, chimpanzee, and baboons in terms of origin, trajectory and innervated structures, when the data are available. Variation is very common in the primates because of, inter alia, 1) the problem of the anatomical position, i.e., some primatologists used the human anatomical position to describe those in non-human primates, while others used the non-human anatomical position, and the definition of anatomical position (human or non-human position) is not clear; 2) the lateralized and semi-bend pelvis limbs in non-humans primates compared with modern humans; 3) the absence of the some muscles (e.g., scansorius and ilioschiofemoralis) in modern humans in the thigh; and 4) the difference in the numbers of vertebrae among the authors, even in the same species, such as chimpanzees and bearded capuchins.

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Published
2017-01-24
How to Cite
Silva, E., Silva, S., Aversi-Ferreira, R., de Abreu, T., Nishijo, H., & Aversi-Ferreira, T. A. (2017). Comparative anatomy of the pelvic nerves in bearded capuchins (Sapajus sp). Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Research and Animal Science, 53(4), 1-17. https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.1678-4456.bjvras.2016.82570
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