Depressive Symptoms and Relationship Between Genders: Differences in Young Adults in a Randomized Clinical Trial

  • Mariane Ricardo Acosta Lopez Molina Universidade Católica de Pelotas
  • Karen Jansen Universidade Católica de Pelotas
  • Ricardo Tavares Pinheiro Universidade Católica de Pelotas
  • Ricardo Azevedo da Silva Universidade Católica de Pelotas
  • Miguel Bezerra dos Passos Universidade Católica de Pelotas
  • Luciano Dias de Mattos Souza Universidade Católica de Pelotas
Keywords: symptoms, depression, gender, young adults, cognitive therapy

Abstract

Depression has a high prevalence in the general population, especially among women. There is no consensus in the scientific literature about differences between men and women in the manifestations of depressive symptoms, nor about psychotherapy indications according to gender. This research aimed to verify differences in depressive symptoms and symptoms improvement between young adult men and women with current Major Depressive Disorder and to identify differences between two brief Cognitive Psychotherapy models. Randomized clinical trial in which participants were randomized between: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Narrative Cognitive Therapy. Depressive symptoms pre and post-intervention were evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The sample was composed of 25 men and 95 women. Genital symptoms and insight were significantly different between genders. Concerning improvement in symptoms according to the psychotherapy model, CBT presented a trend toward being more effective in men. Therefore, the symptoms and improvement in depressive symptoms are manifested differently between genders.

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Published
2017-08-01
How to Cite
Molina, M., Jansen, K., Pinheiro, R., Silva, R., Passos, M., & Souza, L. (2017). Depressive Symptoms and Relationship Between Genders: Differences in Young Adults in a Randomized Clinical Trial. Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto), 27(67), 3-9. https://doi.org/10.1590/1982-43272767201701
Section
Articles