Reduction of prefrontal thickness in military police officers with post-traumatic stress disorder

Authors

  • Leonardo Baldaçara Federal University of Tocantins
  • Célia Araújo Federal University of São Paulo
  • Idaiane Assunção Federal University of São Paulo
  • Ivaldo da Silva Federal University of São Paulo
  • Andrea Parolin Jackowski Federal University of São Paulo

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1590/0101-60830000000128

Keywords:

Post-traumatic stress disorder, cortical thickness, limbic system, police officers, trauma

Abstract

Background Brain-imaging studies in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have consistently revealed alterations in brain structure and function and this is correlated to symptomatology. However, few studies have investigated the role of biomarkers in PTSD some specific groups, as police officers. Objective To evaluate prefrontal and limbic volumes, and cortical thickness of police officers exposed to trauma during work who developed post-traumatic stress disorder, resilient matched controls (without PTSD), and compared to healthy civilians. Methods Prefrontal and limbic volumes, and cortical thickness of 12 police officers with PTSD, 12 resilient police officers, and 12 healthy civilians who underwent brain MRI were analyzed. Results Differences in limbic structures volume were not significative after Bonferroni correction. A significant reduction in cortical thickness on right rostral cingulate, right and left middle frontal gyrus, left superior frontal, left lingual, calcarine and cuneus were observed in PTSD group in comparison to controls was observed. Discussion Although preliminary, our results suggested not only the association between cortical thickness and PTSD, but also indicated that patients and controls have anatomical differences.

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Published

2017-08-01

How to Cite

Baldaçara, L., Araújo, C., Assunção, I., Silva, I. da, & Jackowski, A. P. (2017). Reduction of prefrontal thickness in military police officers with post-traumatic stress disorder. Archives of Clinical Psychiatry, 44(4), 94-98. https://doi.org/10.1590/0101-60830000000128

Issue

Section

Original Articles