Aspergillosis in domestic and wild birds from Argentina

Authors

  • Romina Della Vedova Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Departamento de Microbiología https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5330-1216
  • Alejandra Hevia Administración Nacional de Laboratorios e Institutos de Salud “Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán”, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas Agudas “Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán”, Departamento Micología
  • Walter Vivot Administración Nacional de Laboratorios e Institutos de Salud “Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán”, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas Agudas “Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán”, Departamento Micología
  • Julián Fernández Administración Nacional de Laboratorios e Institutos de Salud “Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán”, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas Agudas “Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán”, Departamento Micología
  • Susana Beatriz Córdoba Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Departamento de Microbiología; Administración Nacional de Laboratorios e Institutos de Salud “Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán”, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas Agudas “Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán”, Departamento Micología http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1991-2400
  • Francisco José Reynaldi Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Departamento de Microbiología; Centro Científico Tecnológico, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1531-4905

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.1678-4456.bjvras.2019.152460

Keywords:

Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillosis, Birds, Antifungal susceptibility test

Abstract

Aspergillus species are widely distributed throughout the world and can develop parasitic and saprophytic ways of life, allowing Aspergillus to infect living hosts, including plants, insects, birds and mammals. The most common form of aspergillosis in poultry and other birds is respiratory infection. Clinical manifestations depend on the infective dose, pre-existing diseases, and the immune response of the host. The aim of the present research was to study aspergillosis in domestic and wild birds from Argentina. We carried out morphological and molecular identification, and determination of antifungal susceptibility against seven antifungal drugs. Six birds from different cities of Buenos Aires Province of Argentina were studied. Three of the samples belonged to broiler chicks, while the other three belonged to an eagle, a pheasant, and a kelp gull. Two isolates were identified as Aspergillus fumigatus by morphological characteristics and growth at 50 °C. Morphology and BenA sequencing enabled us to identify three isolates as Aspergillus flavus, and one as Aspergillus sydowii. All antifungal drugs tested showed low MIC values, ranging from 0.008 to 1 mg/L. Aspergillosis in birds causes high economic losses and could be controlled by sanitation, avoidance of moldy food, nest and litter and reducing stress factors.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Arné P, Thierry S, Wang D, Deville M, Le Loc’h G, Desoutter A, Féménia F, Nieguitsila A, Huang W, Chermette R, Guillot J. Aspergillus fumigatus in poultry. Int J Microbiol. 2011;2011:746356. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/746356. PMid:21826144.

Barton JT, Daft BM, Read DH, Kinde H, Bickford AA. Tracheal aspergillosis in 6 1/2-week-old chickens caused by Aspergillus flavus. Avian Dis. 1992;36(4):1081-5. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1591580. PMid:1485863.

Beernaert LA, Pasmans F, Van Waeyenberghe L, Dorrestein GM, Verstappen F, Vercammen F, Haesebrouck F, Martel A. Avian Aspergillus fumigatus strains resistant to both itraconazole and voriconazole. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009;53(5):2199-201. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01492-08. PMid:19258265.

Beernaert LA, Pasmans F, Van Waeyenberghe L, Haesebrouck F, Martel A. Aspergillus infections in birds: a review. Avian Pathol. 2010;39(5):325-31. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079457.2010.506210. PMid: 20954008.

CLSI: Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. CLSI standard M38: reference method for broth dilution antifungal susceptibility testing of filamentous fungi. 3rd ed. Wayne: CLSI; 2017.

Copetti MV, Barcelos AS, Kommers GD, Santurio JM, Oliveira FN, Lovato M. Cutaneous, respiratory and hepatic aspergillosis in brazilian white pekin mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Mycopathologia. 2015;179(3-4):321-5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11046-014-9833-6. PMid:25481845.

Dahlhausen B, Abbott R, Vanoverloop P. Rapid detection of pathogenic Aspergillus species in avian samples by real-time PCR assay: a preliminary report. In: Bergman E, editor. Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference & Expo of the Association of Avian Veterinarians; 2004; New Orleans, LA, USA. Teaneck: Association of Avian Veterinarians; 2004. p. 37.

Espinel-Ingroff A, Arendrup M, Cantón E, Cordoba S, Dannaoui E, García-Rodríguez J, Gonzalez GM, Govender NP, Martin-Mazuelos E, Lackner M, Lass-Flörl C, Linares Sicilia MJ, Rodriguez-Iglesias MA, Pelaez T, Shields RK, Garcia-Effron G, Guinea J, Sanguinetti M, Turnidge J.

Multi-center study of method-dependent epidemiological cutoff values for detection of resistance in Candida spp. And Aspergillus spp. to amphotericin B and echinocandins for the Etest agar diffusion method. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2017;61(1):e01792-16. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01792-16. PMid:27799206.

Espinel-Ingroff A, Cuenca-Estrella M, Fothergill A, Fuller J, Ghannoum M, Johnson E, Pelaez T, Pfaller MA, Turnidge J. Wild-type MIC distributions and epidemiological cutoff values for amphotericin B and Aspergillus spp. for the CLSI broth microdilution method (M38-A2 document). Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2011;55(11):5150-4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00686-11. PMid:21876047.

Espinel-Ingroff A, Turnidge J, Alastruey-Izquierdo A, Dannaoui E, Garcia-Effron G, Guinea J, Kidd S, Pelaez T, Sanguinetti M, Meletiadis J, Botterel F, Bustamante B, Chen YC, Chakrabarti A, Chowdhary A, Chryssanthou E, Córdoba S, Gonzalez GM, Guarro J, Johnson EM, Kus JV, Lass-Flörl C, Linares-Sicilia MJ, Martín-Mazuelos E, Negri CE, Pfaller MA, Tortorano AM. Posaconazole MIC distributions for Aspergillus fumigatus SC by four methods: impact of Cyp51A mutations on estimation of epidemiological cutoff values. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2018;62(4):e01916-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01916-17. PMid:29437624.

Gornatti Churria D, Reynaldi FJ, Origlia J, Marcantoni HA, Píscopo MV, Herrero Loyola MA, Reinoso EH, Petruccelli MA. Pulmonary aspergillosis due to Aspergillus flavus infection in a captive Eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus). Braz J Vet Pathol. 2012;5(1):4-6.

Heitman J. Microbial pathogens in the fungal kingdom. Fungal Biol Rev. 2011;25(1):48-60. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fbr.2011.01.003. PMid:21528015.

Joseph V. Aspergillosis in raptors. Seminars in Avian and Exotic Pet Medicine. 2000;9(2):66-74. http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/AX.2000.4617.

Leishangthem GD, Singh ND, Brar RS, Banga HS. Aspergillosis in avian species: a review. Journal of Poultry Science and Technology. 2015;31:1-14.

Ludwig A, Gatineau S, Reynaud MC, Cadoré JL, Bourdoiseau G. Fungal isolation and identification in 21cases of guttural pouch mycosis in horses (1998–2002). Vet J. 2005;169(3):457-61. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2004.06.005. PMid:15848789.

Martin MP, Bouck KP, Helm J, Dykstra MJ, Wages DP, Barnes HJ. Disseminated Aspergillus flavus in broiler breeder pullets. Avian Dis. 2007;51(2):626-31. http://dx.doi.org/10.1637/0005-2086(2007)51[626:DAFIIB]2.0.CO;2. PMid:17626498.

Perelman B, Kuttin ES. Aspergillosis in ostriches. Avian Pathol. 1992;21(1):159-63. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079459208418830. PMid:18670927.

Pfaller MA, Castanheira M, Messer SA, Moet GJ, Jones RN. Echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus : application of new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiologic cutoff values to characterize resistance in the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (2009). Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011;69(1):45-50. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2010.08.013. PMid:21146713.

Pfaller MA, Diekema DJ, Ghannoum MA, Rex JH, Alexander BD, Andes D, Brown SD, Chaturvedi V, Espinel-Ingroff A, Fowler CL, Johnson EM, Knapp CC, Motyl MR, Ostrosky-Zeichner L, Sheehan DJ, Walsh TJ. Wild type MIC distribution and epidemiological cutoff values for Aspergillus fumigatus and three triazoles as determined by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution methods. J Clin Microbiol. 2009;47(10):3142-6. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00940-09. PMid:19692559.

Pitt JI. The current role of Aspergillus and Penicillium in human and animal health. J Med Vet Mycol. 1994;32(Suppl 1):17-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02681219480000701. PMid:7722784.

Richard JL, Thurston JR. Rapid hematogenous dissemination of Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus spores in turkey poults following aerosol exposure. Avian Dis. 1983;27(4):1025-33. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1590203. PMid:6418131.

Rypien KL, Andras JP, Harvell CD. Globally panmictic population structure in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus sydowii. Mol Ecol. 2008;17(18):4068-78. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.03894.x. PMid:18684135.

Samson RA, Visagie CM, Houbraken J, Hong SB, Hubka V, Klaassen CHW, Perrone G, Seifert KA, Susca A, Tanney JB, Varga J, Kocsubé S, Szigeti G, Yaguchi T, Frisvad JC. Phylogeny, identification and nomenclature of the genus Aspergillus. Stud Mycol. 2014;78(1):141-71. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.simyco.2014.07.004. PMid:25492982.

Seyedmousavi S, Guillot J, Arné P, De Hoog GS, Mouton JW, Melchers WJG, Verweij PE. Aspergillus and aspergilloses in wild and domestic animals: a global health concern with parallels to human disease. Med Mycol. 2015;53(8):765-97. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mmy/myv067. PMid:26316211.

StatSoft [Internet]. Tulsa: StatSoft; 2018 [cited 2018 dec 7]. Available from: www.statsoft.com Talbot JJ, Thompson P, Vogelnest L, Barrs VR. Identification of pathogenic Aspergillus isolates from captive birds in Australia. Med Mycol. 2018;56(8):1038-41. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mmy/myx137. PMid:29228225.

Tell LA. Aspergillosis in mammals and birds: impact on veterinary medicine. Med Mycol. 2005;43(Suppl 1):S71-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13693780400020089. PMid:16110795.

Vanderheyden N. Aspergillosis in psittacine chicks. In: Jackson G, editor. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Association of Avian Veterinarians; 1993; Nashville, TN, USA. Teaneck: Association of Avian Veterinarians; 1993. p. 207.

Wang DY, Hadj-Henni L, Thierry S, Arné P, Chermette R, Botterel F, Hadrich I, Makni F, Ayadi A, Ranque S, Huang WY, Guillot J. Simple and highly discriminatory VNTR-based multiplex PCR for tracing sources of Aspergillus flavus isolates. PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e44204. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0044204. PMid:23028503.

Ziołkowska G, Tokarzewski S, Nowakiewicz A. Drug resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus strains isolated from flocks of domestic geese in Poland. Poult Sci. 2014;93(5):1106-12. http://dx.doi.org/10.3382/ps.2013-03702. PMid:24795302.

Downloads

Published

2019-08-15

Issue

Section

FULL ARTICLE

How to Cite

1.
Della Vedova R, Hevia A, Vivot W, Fernández J, Córdoba SB, Reynaldi FJ. Aspergillosis in domestic and wild birds from Argentina. Braz. J. Vet. Res. Anim. Sci. [Internet]. 2019 Aug. 15 [cited 2024 Jul. 25];56(2):e152460. Available from: https://www.revistas.usp.br/bjvras/article/view/152460