First report of fibropapillomatosis (FP) and Chelonid alphaherpesvirus 5 (ChHV5) in a green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) from the historically fibropapillomatosis-free Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Northeastern Brazil

Authors

  • Marco Aurélio Gattamorta Universidade de São Paulo, Grupo de Pesquisa sobre Fibropapilomatose em Tartarugas Marinhas ; Instituto Federal de São Paulo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9618-9466
  • Simone Almeida Gavilan Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Morfologia, Laboratório de Morfofisiologia de Vertebrados ; Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Projeto Cetáceos da Costa Branca https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1163-9822
  • Flavio José Lima da Silva Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Projeto Cetáceos da Costa Branca ; Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Naturais, Projeto Golfinho Rotador https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6521-9367
  • Roberta Ramblas Zamana Universidade de São Paulo, Grupo de Pesquisa sobre Fibropapilomatose em Tartarugas Marinhas ; Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Departamento de Patologia, Laboratório de Patologia Comparada de Animais Selvagens https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4422-321X
  • Fabiola Eloisa Setim Universidade de São Paulo, Grupo de Pesquisa sobre Fibropapilomatose em Tartarugas Marinhas ; Fundação Projeto Tamar https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6532-694X
  • Silmara Rossi Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Morfologia, Laboratório de Morfofisiologia de Vertebrados https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0281-7236
  • Daniel Solon Dias de Farias Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Morfologia, Laboratório de Morfofisiologia de Vertebrados ; Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Projeto Cetáceos da Costa Branca https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5923-8625
  • Radan Elvis Matias de Oliveira Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Morfologia, Laboratório de Morfofisiologia de Vertebrados ; Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Projeto Cetáceos da Costa Branca https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0370-4447
  • Augusto Carlos da Boaviagem Freire Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Projeto Cetáceos da Costa Branca https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1705-2096
  • Armando José Barsante Santos Florida State University, Marine Turtle Research, Ecology and Conservation Group, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0696-329X
  • Paulo Hunold Lara Fundação Projeto Tamar https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8669-7272
  • Eliana Reiko Matushima Universidade de São Paulo, Grupo de Pesquisa sobre Fibropapilomatose em Tartarugas Marinhas ; Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Departamento de Patologia, Laboratório de Patologia Comparada de Animais Selvagens https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2526-7601

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.1678-4456.bjvras.2022.181776

Keywords:

Alphaherpesvirus, Fibropapilloma, Brazilian Atlantic coast, Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Marine turtles, Tumors

Abstract

Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is an infectious disease caused by Chelonid alphaherpesvirus 5 (ChHV5). Nevertheless, its clinical manifestations are considered multifactorial. Due to its relevance, FP is currently monitored in sea turtle populations in the United States, Australia, Caribbean, and Brazil. Between 2000 and 2020, the TAMAR Project/ TAMAR Project Foundation analyzed the prevalence of FP in nine states and oceanic islands along the Brazilian coast, including Fernando de Noronha Archipelago (FNA), a historically FP-free area. A total of 4,435 green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) were monitored from 2010 to 2016. Additionally, in 2012 and 2014, 43 FP-free skin samples were analyzed for ChHV5 using a qualitative PCR for the UL30 polymerase (pol) sequence. In 2015, a bilateral ocular nodule characterized as an FP tumor was reported in one of the monitored individuals undergoing rehabilitation. Tissue samples were collected following surgical removal of the tumor. Characterization of a 454 bp UL30 polymerase gene revealed a ChHV5 sequence previously reported in other areas of the Atlantic Brazilian coast. In the years following this finding from January 2017 to March 2020, a total of 360 C. mydas were monitored in the same area and no FP tumors were detected. This is the first report of FP and the first detection of ChHV5 in FNA, a finding of great concern considering this site’s historical absence of FP occurrence. This study highlights the importance of monitoring this disease in historically FP-free areas of the Brazilian Atlantic coast.

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Published

2022-03-17

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CASE REPORT

How to Cite

1.
Gattamorta MA, Gavilan SA, Silva FJL da, Zamana RR, Setim FE, Rossi S, et al. First report of fibropapillomatosis (FP) and Chelonid alphaherpesvirus 5 (ChHV5) in a green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) from the historically fibropapillomatosis-free Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Northeastern Brazil. Braz. J. Vet. Res. Anim. Sci. [Internet]. 2022 Mar. 17 [cited 2024 May 30];59:e181776. Available from: https://www.revistas.usp.br/bjvras/article/view/181776