Ammonia poisoning in cattle fed extruded or prilled urea: alterations in some chemistry components

Authors

  • Alexandre Coutinho Antonelli Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP
  • Gabriel Adrian Sanches Torres Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP
  • Clara Satsuki Mori Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP
  • Pierre Castro Soares Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Departamento de Medicina Veterinária, Recife, PE
  • Celso Akio Maruta Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP
  • Enrico Lippi Ortolani Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.1678-4456.bjvras.2009.26752

Keywords:

Urea, Ammonia, Bovines, Poisoning, Biochemical changes

Abstract

Twelve yearling Girolando steers never fed urea before were assigned randomly in two groups of six animals each. In both groups were administered intraruminally a single dose (0.5 g/kg BW) of extruded or prilled urea in order to induce ammonia poisoning. Plasma or serum levels of ammonia, urea, creatinine, glucose, L-lactate were determined. Hematocrit values were also recorded. Blood samples were taken before the administration of urea, at the onset of muscle tremors, at the first convulsive episode, and 240 minutes after the beginning of the urea feeding. Hyperammonemia already occured at the time of the first muscle tremors. Glucose and L-lactate levels were higher at the peak of the intoxication (convulsive episode), which were higher compared to the beginning of the experiment. Endogenous production of urea increased during the experiment due to hyperammonemia (r = 0.57), reaching peak levels at the end of the trials. Higher ammonia values lead to increased concentrations of L-lactate, glucose, urea, creatinine and hematocrit values. These results showed that high levels of ammonia increased glyconeogenesis, anaerobic glycolysis, the endogenous synthesis of urea and the level of dehydration. L-lactate and glucose were the best variables to monitor biochemical changes in cases of ammonia poisoning.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Published

2009-02-01

Issue

Section

UNDEFINIED

How to Cite

1.
Antonelli AC, Torres GAS, Mori CS, Soares PC, Maruta CA, Ortolani EL. Ammonia poisoning in cattle fed extruded or prilled urea: alterations in some chemistry components. Braz. J. Vet. Res. Anim. Sci. [Internet]. 2009 Feb. 1 [cited 2024 May 29];46(1):69-76. Available from: https://www.revistas.usp.br/bjvras/article/view/26752