Computed tomography imaging of early coronary artery lesions in stable individuals with multiple cardiovascular risk factors

  • Xi Yang Guangxi Medical University; Division of Geriatrics Endocrinology
  • Hong Huang Guangxi Medical University; Division of Geriatrics Endocrinology
  • Hong Liu Guangxi Medical University; Division of Geriatrics Endocrinology
  • Zhi-Yu Zeng Guangxi Medical University; Division of Geriatrics Endocrinology
  • Jie Zhang Guangxi Medical University; Division of Geriatrics Endocrinology

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence, extent, severity, and features of coronary artery lesions in stable patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS: Seventy-seven patients with more than 3 cardiovascular risk factors were suspected of having coronary artery disease. Patients with high-risk factors and 39 controls with no risk factors were enrolled in the study. The related risk factors included hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, smoking history, and overweight. The characteristics of coronary lesions were identified and evaluated by 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography. RESULTS: The incidence of coronary atherosclerosis was higher in the high-risk group than in the no-risk group. The involved branches of the coronary artery, the diffusivity of the lesion, the degree of stenosis, and the nature of the plaques were significantly more severe in the high-risk group compared with the no-risk group (all p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Among stable individuals with high-risk factors, early coronary artery lesions are common and severe. Computed tomography has promising value for the early screening of coronary lesions.

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Published
2015-04-01
How to Cite
Yang, X., Huang, H., Liu, H., Zeng, Z.-Y., & Zhang, J. (2015). Computed tomography imaging of early coronary artery lesions in stable individuals with multiple cardiovascular risk factors . Clinics, 70(4), 242-246. https://doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2015(04)04
Section
Clinical Sciences