Platelets can reflect the severity of Crohn’s disease without the effect of anemia

Authors

  • Lin Li Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology
  • Ping Xu Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology
  • Zhongchen Zhang Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology
  • Xinxin Zhou Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology
  • Chunxiao Chen Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3511-1822
  • Chao Lu Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1265-0903

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2020/e1596

Keywords:

Platelet, Anemia, Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Anemia and changes in platelets (PLT) are common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In our study, we aimed to verify whether PLT count can independently reflect the severity of IBD. METHODS: In our hospital, 137 Crohn’s Disease (CD), 69 Ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and 412 healthy controls were included to compare the differences in PLT count. In addition, the effect of anemia, C-reactive protein (CRP), age, CD activity index (CDAI) or Mayo on PLTs was also analyzed. If PLTs independently affected CD or UC, we used the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to verify the diagnostic value and obtain the cut-off value of PLT. RESULTS: CD and UC patients had higher PLT than controls (po0.001, po0.001; respectively). In CD patients, the results showed that patients with anemia (Po0.01), Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) (po0.001), CRPX8 mg/L (p=0.046), and CDAIX150 (po0.001) had higher PLT, while in UC patients, those with anemia (p=0.018), CRPX8 mg/L (p=0.045), and MayoX3 (p=0.029) had higher PLT. Univariate analysis showed that CDAI was positively correlated with PLT count (po0.001), while hemoglobin (p=0.001) and age (po0.001) were negatively correlated with PLT in CD. In UC patients, Mayo (p=0.001) and CRP (po0.001) were positively correlated with PLT, while hemoglobin (p=0.002) was negatively correlated. Finally, by linear stepwise multivariate analysis, we clarified the positive relationship between PLT and CD (po0.001) by eliminating the interference of hemoglobin, and determined the cut-off value of PLT as 298 109/L. For UC, we did not obtain similar results. CONCLUSIONS: PLT can be an indicator of disease severity in CD, while there is a lack of evidence regarding this finding in UC.

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Published

2020-07-27

How to Cite

Li, L., Xu, P., Zhang, Z., Zhou, X., Chen, C., & Lu, C. (2020). Platelets can reflect the severity of Crohn’s disease without the effect of anemia. Clinics, 75, e1596. https://doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2020/e1596

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Section

Original Articles