Concordance of Chest CT and Nucleic Acid Testing in Diagnosing Coronavirus Disease Outside its District of Origin (Wuhan, China)

Authors

  • Li-Qin Yang Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Department of Radiology
  • Jin-Ming Cao Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology
  • Tian-Wu Chen Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5776-3429
  • Jian-Qiong Yang Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology
  • Qi-Wen Mu North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong Central Hospital/Second School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2020/e1910

Keywords:

Coronavirus, COVID-19, Computed Tomography, Nucleic Acid Testing

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the concordance between CT and nucleic acid testing in diagnosing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside its district of origin (Wuhan, China). METHODS: Twenty-three consecutive patients with COVID-19, confirmed by nucleic acid testing, were enrolled from two designated hospitals outside the district of disease origin. We collected clinical, laboratory, and CT data and assessed the concordance between CT manifestations and nucleic acid test results by comparing the percentage of patients with and without abnormal CT findings. Furthermore, using Chi-square tests, we analyzed the differences in CT manifestations between patients with and without an exposure history or symptoms. RESULTS: Multiple ground-glass opacities (GGOs), with or without consolidation, were observed on the initial CT scans of 19 patients (82.6%), whereas the remaining 4 (17.4%) showed no CT abnormalities, indicating that the initial chest CT findings were not entirely concordant with the nucleic acid test results in diagnosing COVID-19. Among the latter 4 patients, we observed multiple GGOs with and without consolidation in 2 patients on the follow-up chest CT scans taken on days 7 and 14 after admission, respectively. The remaining 2 patients showed no abnormalities on the follow-up CT scans. Furthermore, abnormal CT findings were found more frequently in patients who had been exposed to COVID-19 in its district of origin than in those who had not been exposed and in symptomatic patients than in asymptomatic patients (all po0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with positive results on nucleic acid testing may or may not have the abnormal CT manifestations that are frequently found in symptomatic patients with a history of exposure to the district of COVID-19 origin.

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Published

2020-08-27

How to Cite

Yang, L.-Q., Cao, J.-M., Chen, T.-W., Yang, J.-Q., & Mu, Q.-W. (2020). Concordance of Chest CT and Nucleic Acid Testing in Diagnosing Coronavirus Disease Outside its District of Origin (Wuhan, China). Clinics, 75, e1910. https://doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2020/e1910

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Original Articles