Effects of a buried magnetic field on cranial bone reconstruction in rats

Authors

  • Maíra Cavallet de ABREU Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul; Faculdade de Odontologia; Departamento de Cirurgia Oral e Maxilofacial
  • Deise PONZONI Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul; Faculdade de Odontologia; Departamento de Cirurgia Oral e Maxilofacial
  • Renan LANGIE Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul; Faculdade de Odontologia; Departamento de Cirurgia Oral e Maxilofacial
  • Felipe Ernesto ARTUZI Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul; Faculdade de Odontologia; Departamento de Cirurgia Oral e Maxilofacial
  • Edela PURICELLI Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul; Faculdade de Odontologia; Departamento de Cirurgia Oral e Maxilofacial

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1590/1678-775720150336

Abstract

The understanding of bone repair phenomena is a fundamental part of dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Objective The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of buried magnetic field stimulation on bone repair in rat calvaria after reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts, synthetic powdered hydroxyapatite, or allogeneic cartilage grafts, with or without exposure to magnetic stimulation. Material and Methods Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into 18 groups of five animals each. Critical bone defects were created in the rats’ calvaria and immediately reconstructed with autogenous bone, powdered synthetic hydroxyapatite or allogeneic cartilage. Magnetic implants were also placed in half the animals. Rats were euthanized for analysis at 15, 30, and 60 postoperative days. Histomorphometric analyses of the quantity of bone repair were performed at all times. Results These analyses showed significant group by postoperative time interactions (p=0.008). Among the rats subjected to autogenous bone reconstruction, those exposed to magnetic stimulation had higher bone fill percentages than those without magnetic implants. Results also showed that the quality of bone repair remained higher in the former group as compared to the latter at 60 postoperative days. Conclusions After 60 postoperative days, bone repair was greater in the group treated with autogenous bone grafts and exposed to a magnetic field, and bone repair was most pronounced in animals treated with autogenous bone grafts, followed by those treated with powdered synthetic hydroxyapatite and allogeneic cartilage grafts.

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Published

2016-04-01

Issue

Section

Original Articles