Temporomandibular joint disc displacement with reduction

a review of mechanisms and clinical presentation

Authors

  • Rodrigo Lorenzi Poluha Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru, Departamento de Prótese, Grupo de Dor Orofacial de Bauru https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7180-6448
  • Giancarlo De la Torre Canales Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru, Departamento de Prótese, Grupo de Dor Orofacial de Bauru https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0921-342X
  • Yuri Martins Costa Universidade de Campinas, Faculdade de Odontologia de Piracicaba, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas
  • Eduardo Grossmann Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Faculdade de Odontologia, Departamento de Ciências Morfológicas https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1238-1707
  • Leonardo Rigoldi Bonjardim Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Seção de Fisiologia da Cabeça e da Face https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0080-7678
  • Paulo César Rodrigues Conti Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru, Departamento de Prótese, Grupo de Dor Orofacial de Bauru

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1590/1678-7757-2018-0433

Keywords:

Temporomandibular joint, Temporomandibular joint disc, Temporomandibular joint disorders

Abstract

Erratum

Disc displacement with reduction (DDWR) is one of the most common intra-articular disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Factors related to the etiology, progression and treatment of such condition is still a subject of discussion. This literature review aimed to address etiology, development, related factors, diagnosis, natural course, and treatment of DDWR. A nonsystematic search was conducted within PubMed, Scopus, SciELO, Medline, LILACS and Science Direct using the Medical Subjective Headings (MeSH) terms “temporomandibular disorders”, “temporomandibular joint”, “disc displacement” and “disc displacement with reduction”. No time restriction was applied. Literature reviews, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and clinical trials were included. DDWR is usually asymptomatic and requires no treatment, since the TMJ structures adapt very well and painlessly to different disc positions. Yet, long-term studies have shown the favorable progression of this condition, with no pain and/or jaw locking occurring in most of the patients.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Downloads

Published

2019-06-05

Issue

Section

Literature Review