Reduced foraging in the presence of predator cues by the Black Spiny-tailed Iguana, Ctenosaura similis (Sauria: Iguanidae)

Authors

  • Vincent R. Farallo Ohio University; Department of Biological Sciences
  • Mahmood Sasa Organization for Tropical Biology; Palo Verde Biological Station
  • Dennis K. Wasko University of Hartford; Hillyer College
  • Michael R. J. Forstner Texas State University-San Marcos; Department of Biology

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v9i2p109-119

Keywords:

Squamata, Iguania, Costa Rica, foraging, predator avoidance, predator-prey interactions

Abstract

The presence of a predator may have direct and indirect effects on the behavior of the prey. Although altered behavior may help prey avoid predators, it also can have a potential impact on critical activities such as foraging. Predator-prey interactions are routinely studied in laboratory-based experiments owing to the perceived difficulties of conducting such experiments in natural settings. We conducted an experimental study under field conditions in Palo Verde National Park in northwestern Costa Rica to assess behavioral responses of Black Spiny-tailed Iguanas (Ctenosaura similis) to the presence of predators and predator cues. Free-roaming iguanas were offered mango in designated areas in the presence of a predator (Boa constrictor), a predator cue (B. constrictor feces), and a control (no predator or predator cue). Results indicate that iguanas reduced their foraging efforts in the presence of both a predator and its cue.

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Published

2010-12-01

How to Cite

Farallo, V. R., Sasa, M., Wasko, D. K., & Forstner, M. R. J. (2010). Reduced foraging in the presence of predator cues by the Black Spiny-tailed Iguana, Ctenosaura similis (Sauria: Iguanidae). Phyllomedusa: Journal of Herpetology, 9(2), 109-119. https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.2316-9079.v9i2p109-119

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Articles