Factors affecting the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in inpatient units: perception of nurses

  • Clairton Marcos Citolino Filho Universidade de São Paulo; Faculdade de Medicina; Hospital das Clínicas
  • Eduesley Santana Santos Universidade de São Paulo; Faculdade de Medicina; Hospital das Clínicas
  • Rita de Cassia Gengo e Silva Universidade de São Paulo; Escola de Enfermagem
  • Lilia de Souza Nogueira Universidade de São Paulo; Escola de Enfermagem

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To identify, in the perception of nurses, the factors that affect the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in adult inpatient units, and investigate the influence of both work shifts and professional experience length of time in the perception of these factors. METHOD A descriptive, exploratory study conducted at a hospital specialized in cardiology and pneumology with the application of a questionnaire to 49 nurses working in inpatient units. RESULTS The majority of nurses reported that the high number of professionals in the scenario (75.5%), the lack of harmony (77.6%) or stress of any member of staff (67.3%), lack of material and/or equipment failure (57.1%), lack of familiarity with the emergency trolleys (98.0%) and presence of family members at the beginning of the cardiopulmonary arrest assistance (57.1%) are factors that adversely affect the quality of care provided during CPR. Professional experience length of time and the shift of nurses did not influence the perception of these factors. CONCLUSION The identification of factors that affect the quality of CPR in the perception of nurses serves as parameter to implement improvements and training of the staff working in inpatient units.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Published
2015-12-01
How to Cite
Citolino Filho, C., Santos, E., Silva, R., & Nogueira, L. (2015). Factors affecting the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in inpatient units: perception of nurses . Revista Da Escola De Enfermagem Da USP, 49(6), 907-913. https://doi.org/10.1590/S0080-623420150000600005
Section
Original Articles