“Constant dripping wears away the stone”: the path of waters in social catalysis in Colonial Brazil

  • Claudia R. Plens Departamento de História, Escola de Filosofia, Letras e Ciencias Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Paulo
  • Vagner Carvalheiro Porto Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia, Universidade de São Paulo
Keywords: Archaeology of Colonialism, gold mining, indigenous slave labour, Archaeology of the Movement, Sacred Archaeology

Abstract

Guarulhos has many natural paths through hills, mountains, and
a network of watersheds that allowed the Europeans to move around, enslave
humans, and exploit local mineral resources. Besides the natural routes, Guarulhos
(São Paulo, Brazil) gold mining archaeological remains (dated back to 1590
according to historical data) also show the great effort made by humans, especially
indigenous people, for the construction of reservoirs and canals used for gold
mining. Today’s region of Guarulhos is important for understanding the earliest
forms of contact during the Portuguese colonization. The region sheds light on the
interaction between Portuguese and indigenous groups, as well as the Portuguese
strategies for territorial expansion. The purpose of this article is to point out
how the mining process has been shaping the behavior of Guarulhos’s different
segments of society since the beginning of this economic cycle to the present day

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Author Biography

Claudia R. Plens, Departamento de História, Escola de Filosofia, Letras e Ciencias Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Paulo
Departamento de História, Escola de Filosofia, Letras e Ciencias Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Paulo
Published
2016-08-13
How to Cite
Plens, C., & Porto, V. (2016). “Constant dripping wears away the stone”: the path of waters in social catalysis in Colonial Brazil. Revista Do Museu De Arqueologia E Etnologia, (26), 95-114. https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.2448-1750.revmae.2016.119017
Section
Dossiê