Cognitive screening test in primary care

cut points for low education

Authors

  • Juliana Emy Yokomizo Universidade de São Paulo. Faculdade de Medicina
  • Katrin Seeher University of New South Wales. Dementia Collaborative Research Center
  • Glaucia Martins de Oliveira Universidade de São Paulo. Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades
  • Laís dos Santos Vinholi e Silva Silva Universidade de São Paulo. Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades
  • Laura Saran Universidade de São Paulo. Faculdade de Medicina
  • Henry Brodaty University of New South Wales. Dementia Collaborative Research Center
  • Ivan Aprahamian Universidade de São Paulo. Faculdade de Medicina
  • Monica Sanches Yassuda Universidade de São Paulo. Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades
  • Cássio Machado de Campos Bottino Universidade de São Paulo. Faculdade de Medicina

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.11606/S1518-8787.2018052000462

Keywords:

Aged, Cognitive Dysfunction classification, Dementia, diagnosis, Educational Status, Psychometrics, Geriatric Psychiatry, Surveys and Questionnaires, utilization

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To establish the diagnostic accuracy of the Brazilian version of the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG-Br) compared to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in individuals with low educational level. METHODS: Ninety-three patients (≥ 60 years old) from Brazilian primary care units provided sociodemographic, cognitive, and functional data. Receiver operating characteristics, areas under the curve (AUC) and logistic regressions were conducted. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients with 0–4 years of education. Cases (n = 44) were older (p = 0.006) and performed worse than controls (n = 49) on all cognitive or functional measures (p < 0.001). The GPCOG-Br demonstrated similar diagnostic accuracy to the MMSE (AUC = 0.90 and 0.91, respectively) and similar positive and negative predictive values (PPV/NPV, respectively: 0.79/0.86 for GPCOG-Br and 0.79/0.81 for MMSE). Adjusted cut-points displayed high sensitivity (all 86%) and satisfactory specificity (65%–80%). Lower educational level predicted lower cognitive performance. CONCLUSIONS: The GPCOG-Br is clinically well-suited for use in primary care.

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Published

2018-11-14

How to Cite

Yokomizo, J. E., Seeher, K., Oliveira, G. M. de, Silva, L. dos S. V. e S., Saran, L., Brodaty, H., Aprahamian, I., Yassuda, M. S., & Bottino, C. M. de C. (2018). Cognitive screening test in primary care: cut points for low education. Revista De Saúde Pública, 52, 88. https://doi.org/10.11606/S1518-8787.2018052000462

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Section

Original Articles