Inactive commuting to work and associated factors in industrial workers

Authors

  • Carla Menêses Hardman Universidade de Pernambuco; Escola Superior de Educação Física
  • Simone Storino Honda Barros Universidade de Pernambuco; Escola Superior de Educação Física
  • Elusa Santina Antunes de Oliveira Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina; Centro de Desportos
  • Markus Vinicius Nahas Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina; Centro de Desportos
  • Mauro Virgilio Gomes de Barros Universidade de Pernambuco

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1590/sausoc.v22i3.76474

Abstract

This study analyzed the prevalence of and identified the factors associated with inactive commuting to work among industrial workers from Pernambuco, Brazil. Data for this cross-sectional study were gathered from a sample of 1,910 industrial employees by using a previously validated questionnaire. The measure of inactive commuting to work was based on self-reported time and mode of transportation to work on most days of a typical week. Data analysis was carried out through binary logistic regression using a hierarchical approach to include variables in the model. It was observed that 84.2% of workers were inactive commuters. After adjustment for demographic, socio-economic, and other health-related factors in both men and women, it was found that family income and company size were directly associated with inactive commuting to work. Moreover, among men, inactive commuting was directly associated with schooling level and was associated with a diagnosis of diabetes. It was concluded that the prevalence of inactive commuting to work was high and directly associated with individual, social, and organizational factors.

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Published

2013-09-01

How to Cite

Hardman, C. M., Barros, S. S. H., Oliveira, E. S. A. de, Nahas, M. V., & Barros, M. V. G. de. (2013). Inactive commuting to work and associated factors in industrial workers. Saúde E Sociedade, 22(3), 760-772. https://doi.org/10.1590/sausoc.v22i3.76474

Issue

Section

Part I - Dossier