Coronavirus in Brazil: the march of folly

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1590/S0104-12902021200653

Keywords:

Covid-19, Coronavirus, Pandemics, Public Health, Public Policy

Abstract

The circulation of the new coronavirus is a health event in the dimensions of the Dantesque phenomenon that constituted the Spanish Flu, but aggravated by the fact that we live in an interconnected world. The choice of this object of study was imposed due to the worldwide concern with the covid-19, and the perception that there are persistent questions and insufficient analyses that explain the intrinsic relationship between the health-disease process and the political, economic and social dimensions associated with it. We defend that the foolish and uncoordinated confrontation of the epidemic in Brazil would have affected the number of cases and deaths. This is an exploratory study, supported by the theoretical framework of critical hermeneutics, developed based on the analysis of documents and data, which aims at analyzing the epidemiological profile of Covid-19 and to discuss economic, social policies and sanitary measures adopted in Brazil in the face of the pandemic situation. We concluded that the political, economic, social and sanitary folly in the application of public policies combined with the lack of coordination of the federal government of Brazil in confronting the covid-19 pandemic reflected in the exponential increase in the number of cases and deaths, especially among the poorest and most vulnerable populations.

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Author Biographies

Adilson Soares, Secretaria de Saúde do Estado de São Paulo

Secretaria de Saúde do Estado de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil.

Ricardo Fernandes de Menezes, Secretaria de Saúde do Estado de São Paulo

Secretaria de Saúde do Estado de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil.

Published

2021-06-02

How to Cite

Soares, A., & Menezes, R. F. de. (2021). Coronavirus in Brazil: the march of folly. Saúde E Sociedade, 30(2). https://doi.org/10.1590/S0104-12902021200653

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Section

Articles