An interesting finding in the uterine cervix: Schistosoma hematobium calcified eggs

  • Alexia Toller Departamento de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia - Hospital de São Francisco Xavier - Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Lisboa
  • Ana Carolina Scopin Departamento de Ginecologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo/SP
  • Vanessa Apfel Departamento de Ginecologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo/SP
  • Karla Calaça Kabbach Prigenzi Departamento de Patologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo/SP
  • Fernanda Kesselring Tso Departamento de Ginecologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo/SP
  • Gustavo Rubino de Azevedo Focchi Departamento de Patologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo/SP
  • Neila Speck Departamento de Ginecologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo/SP
  • Julisa Ribalta Departamento de Ginecologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo/SP
Keywords: Schistosoma hematobium, Genital Diseases, Female, Schistosomiasis hematobia, HIV

Abstract

Schistosoma hematobium infection is an endemic parasitic disease in Africa, which is frequently associated with urinary schistosomiasis. The parasite infection causes epithelial changes and disruption, facilitating the infection by the human papilloma virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The authors report the case of a 44-year-old African HIV-positive woman who presented an abnormal routine Pap smear. Colposcopy examination revealed dense acetowhite micropapillary epithelium covering the ectocervix, iodine-negative, an erosion area in endocervical canal, and atypical vessels. Histologic examination of the surgical specimens showed numerous calcified schistosome eggs (probably S. hematobium) and a high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The relation between S. hematobium infection and bladder cancer is well known; however, this relationship with cervical cancer remains controversial. The symptoms of schistosomiasis of the female genital tract are rather non-specific, and are often misdiagnosed with other pelvic diseases. The familiarity of health professionals with schistosomiasis of the female genital tract is less than expected, even in endemic regions. Therefore, great awareness of this differential diagnosis in routine gynecological practice is of paramount importance.

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Published
2015-06-30
How to Cite
Toller, A., Scopin, A., Apfel, V., Prigenzi, K., Tso, F., Focchi, G., Speck, N., & Ribalta, J. (2015). An interesting finding in the uterine cervix: Schistosoma hematobium calcified eggs. Autopsy and Case Reports, 5(2), 41-44. Retrieved from https://www.revistas.usp.br/autopsy/article/view/107008
Section
Article / Clinical Case Report