Canine and feline scabies in São Paulo - Brazil - Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia da Universidade de São Paulo (1984-2002)

Authors

  • Rita de Cássia Carmona Castro Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Hospital Veterinário, Serviço de Dermatologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP
  • Luiz Eduardo Bagini Lucarts Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Hospital Veterinário, Serviço de Dermatologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP
  • Ericka Homman Delayte Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Hospital Veterinário, Serviço de Dermatologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP
  • Mary Otsuka Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Hospital Veterinário, Serviço de Dermatologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP
  • Pedro Manuel Leal Germano Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Saúde Pública, Departamento de Práticas de Saúde Pública, São Paulo, SP
  • Carlos Eduardo Larsson Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Hospital Veterinário, Serviço de Dermatologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica, São Paulo, SP

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.11606/issn.1678-4456.bjvras.2005.26444

Keywords:

Sarcoptic Mange, Notoedric Mange, Dogs, Cats

Abstract

At the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (HOVET) in FMVZ/USP, sarcoptic and notoedric mange are the second and the third most commonly diagnosed parasitic skin diseases, respectively. Between 1984 and 2002, 2907 cases of canine and feline scabies were diagnosed at HOVET. Canine scabies (2283) and feline scabies (624) represented 6.4% and 15.7%, respectively, of the cases seen. Feline scabies was more frequent than canine scabies (p<0.05 ). Canine scabies was more prevalent in pure breeds dogs (58.0%) with long hair (74.2%) and the most commonly affected dog breeds were: Poodle, Cocker Spaniel and German Shepherds. Canine and feline scabies were more frequent in males. Dogs (54.7%) and cats (63.5%) < 12 months old were the most affected. For notoedric mange stray cats, short-haired (74.2%) were most commonly affected. Feline scabies was most common in Siamese , Persian and Burmese cat breed. There was no seasonal difference in the occurence of scabies in either cats or dogs when results were analysed.

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Published

2005-04-01

Issue

Section

UNDEFINIED

How to Cite

1.
Castro R de CC, Lucarts LEB, Delayte EH, Otsuka M, Germano PML, Larsson CE. Canine and feline scabies in São Paulo - Brazil - Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia da Universidade de São Paulo (1984-2002). Braz. J. Vet. Res. Anim. Sci. [Internet]. 2005 Apr. 1 [cited 2024 Jun. 15];42(2):135-42. Available from: https://www.revistas.usp.br/bjvras/article/view/26444